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Wednesday, May 18

  1. page Malaria edited ... Life Cycle of the Anopheline Mosquito In the female anopheline, Plasmodium matures by sexual …
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    Life Cycle of the Anopheline Mosquito
    In the female anopheline, Plasmodium matures by sexual reproduction where it enters the salivary glands of the mosquito. When the mosquito bites its human victim it will pass the Plasmodium sporozoite, which is the infective stage of the Plasmodium parasite, to the human. There, the sporozoites travel to the liver of the human and undergo schizogony in the liver. Schizogony is where the cell participates in multiple fission and the nucleus partakes in multiple divisions before the cell divides. (Mikolajczak, 1501). Schizogony produces thousands of merozoites are released into the bloodstream and they have the ability to enter and infect red blood cells. At this point, the merozoites inside the red blood cells are known as trophozoites because they are in the metabolically active stage of their life cycle. Trophozoites produce and release more merozoites upon rupture of the red blood cell. (Mikolajczak, 1503). The merozoites continue to infect red blood cells, reproducing asexually within the human, but some develop into male or female gametocytes. These gametocytes cannot do any more damage to the human, but if both male and female gametocytes are picked up by an anopheline mosquito they will reproduce sexually in the intestines of the mosquito. Then the gametocytes will form a zygote, resulting in the production of sporozoites, which will travel to the salivary glands of the mosquito. The cycle will restart. The mosquito is the host to the Plasmodium parasite during the sexual reproductive stage. The mosquito is the definite host and the human is the intermediate host because is carries the parasite during asexual reproduction (Mikolajczak, 1499-1506).
    {http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/MalariaLifeCycle02.gif} {http://healthmap.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/lifecycle_diag.jpg} ==== {http://www.cbu.edu/~seisen/MalariaLifeCycle02.gif}
    {http://healthmap.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/lifecycle_diag.jpg}
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    LITERATURE CITED
    Andrade, B. "Towards a Precise Test for Malaria Diagnosis in the Brazilian Amazon: Comparison among Field Microscopy, a Rapid Diagnostic Test, Nested PCR, and a Computational Expert System Based on Artificial Neural Networks." Malaria Journal. 6 May 2010. Web. 18 May 2010. <http://www.malariajournal.com/content/9/1/117>.
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    6:19 pm

Monday, February 21

  1. page Malaria (Sophie) edited ... Author: Sorphorn Ear Date: May 18, 2010 ABTRACT This research paper will give a brief ov…
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    Author: Sorphorn Ear
    Date: May 18, 2010
    ABTRACT
    This research paper will give a brief overview of the bacterial disease called malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax also known as Apicomplexa. This disease’s found in all ages if they were bitten by Anopheles mosquito. In this case, Plasmodium grows by sexual reproduction because Anopheles mosquito carries the infective stage of Plasmodium called sporozoite. This paper will discuss the life cycle of the malaria parasite exploration of drug resistance test, the causes, and the symptoms.
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    2010, from http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090527/full/news.2009.517.html
    Ruebush, T., Kern, M., & Campbell, C. (1995). Self-treatment of malaria in rural area of
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    73(2), 229-236.
    Sanderson,

    Sanderson,
    K. (2009,
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    15, 2010,
    from

    from
    http://www.nature.com/news/2009/090729/full/news.2009.750.html
    Tortora, G. J., Funke, B. R., & Case, C. L. (1995). Microbiology: an introduction (10thth ed., pp.
    229-236). San Francisco: 2010.
    Whitfield, J. (2002, October 3). Portrait of a serial killer. Retrieved April 15, 2010, from
    http://www.nature.com/news/2002/021003/full/news021001-6.html.

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Wednesday, February 2

  1. page Shingles (herpes zoster) edited ​ Herpes Zoster ... Shingles (herpes zoster virus) is an extremely painful viral infection o…


    Herpes Zoster
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    Shingles (herpes zoster virus) is an extremely painful viral infection of the nerve roots resulting in a skin rash caused by the same virus that causes chickenpox. The r {2512.jpg} eactivated virus responsible for these conditions is called the Varicella zoster virus (VZV). After an individual has chickenpox, the virus lives in the nervous system where it "sleeps" (is dormant) in the nerve roots. In some people, it remains dormant forever. In others, a weakened immune system can cause the virus to "wake up," reproduce, and travel along the path of the nerve fiber to the skin's surface, resulting in a painful localized skin rash, usually with blisters (fluid filled sacks) on top of the reddish skin. Shingles usually occurs as a unilateral pain, burning, or tingling and blistering rash extending in a local pattern in the distribution of nerves. Common areas affected by shingles include the face, abdomen, back, buttocks, and chest. If the virus becomes active again, it can only cause shingles, not chickenpox. It is very contagious and can give someone chickenpox if they haven't had it yet. The majority of patients who get shingles are over the age of 60; it infrequently occurs in younger people.
    {2510.jpg}
    Introduction: IIntroduction:I knew I
    {shingles.jpg}
    Discussion:
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Sunday, November 14

  1. page STD's Gonorrhea edited Gonorrhea Author: Gonorrhea Author: Jenny Foster Date: Date: 5-18-2010 Abstract: Go…
    Gonorrhea Author:
    Gonorrhea
    Author:
    Jenny Foster Date:
    Date:
    5-18-2010
    Abstract:
    Gonorrhea is the second most common sexual transmitted disease. This disease targets sexually active people, and in most cases those who are infected don’t even have symptoms. The symptoms for men and women have some similarities and differences, but in both cases if left untreated this can lead to infertility. If symptoms do arise, then it is best to avoid sex and go to a doctor. Unfortunately, the bacterium that causes gonorrhea, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, develops resistance for the antibiotic very quickly. Currently there are drugs that are being used to cure gonorrhea, but there are signs of resistance. To avoid getting gonorrhea, it is best to avoid all sexual contact.
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    Targets of Gonorrhea:
    In the microbiology textbooks it states that gonorrhea is caused by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which is gram-negative diplococcus. As mentioned earlier, the causes of gonorrhea is sexual contact and it cal also be spread from mother to baby during birth. Gonorrhea targets sexually active people, but according to statistics the highest rates of gonorrhea are among sexually active teenagers, impoverished people living in urban areas and Southern states, African Americans, and Drug users. Gonorrhea infects warm, moist areas of the reproductive tract. In women this area includes the cervix, uterus, fallopian tubes and the urethra. In men this area includes the urethra as well. According the CDC gonorrhea also can grow in the mouth, throat, eyes and the anus.
    Symptoms:
    Some men who do have gonorrhea don’t have any signs at all. For those who do have signs, these appear two to five days after they have been infected, but in some cases it can take up to 30 days for symptoms to appear. The symptoms that men usually undergo are: a burning sensation while urinating, or a white, yellow or green discharge from the penis. In some cases, men who have gonorrhea get painful or swollen testicles. If this infection is not treated in men, then this could lead to epididymitis, which is a painful condition of the ducts attached to the testicles that may lead to infertility if left untreated.
    For women who are infected with gonorrhea, most of the time they have no symptoms. But when they do have symptoms, they are often mild, and sometimes are mistaken for a bladder of vaginal infection. Symptoms include: painful or burning sensation when urinating increased vaginal discharge, or vaginal bleeding between periods. If left untreated women with gonorrhea can develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Each year in the US about one million women develop PID. The symptoms of PID can be mild or quite severe. Symptoms include: abdominal pain and fever, internal abscesses (pus-filled pockets that are hard to cure) and chronic pelvic pain. PID can damage the fallopian tubes enough to cause infertility.
    In both men and women, symptoms of rectal infection include: discharge, anal itching, soreness, bleeding, or painful bowel movements. Infections in the throat can cause a sore throat, but usually those who are infected in this area have no symptoms at all. For both men and women if gonorrhea is not treated, then it can spread to the blood or even the joints, this being life threatening. Lastly, those with gonorrhea can become infected more easily with HIV.
    Being Tested:
    As mentioned earlier, sometimes those who are infected don’t even show any signs of having gonorrhea. But, even if you don’t show any signs, you can still be tested and treated. A doctor or even a nurse can obtain a sample from parts of the body that are likely to be infected, this sample can be tested by being sent to the laboratory for analysis. In some cases, if gonorrhea is present in the cervix or the urethra it can be diagnosed in the laboratory by testing a urine sample. A quick laboratory test that can be done is the Gram Stain. A Gram Stain from the cervix or the Urethra allows the doctor to view the bacterium under the microscope.
    Antibiotics:
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Thursday, June 3

  1. page home edited ... {steve_sophie_devin.jpg} See our Class Photos! See Some Videos about Viruses! What are w…
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    {steve_sophie_devin.jpg}
    See our Class Photos!
    See Some Videos about Viruses!
    What are we doing this semester? See our Course Schedule.
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    12:21 pm
  2. page Our Semester Research Projects! edited ... Cholera and its Effects in Africa by Nick Darst and Kelsey Dall Diabetes and Cystic Fibrosis …
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    Cholera and its Effects in Africa by Nick Darst and Kelsey Dall
    Diabetes and Cystic Fibrosis by Megan Fontes and Casey Shield
    Immune System and Cancer by Tiffany Grayson
    Malaria by Emily Lewis and Charlotte Didlake
    Microbial Diseases of the Skin by Bianca M Diaz & Nicole Umemoto-Snyder
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    12:17 pm
  3. page Gram Negative (deleted) edited
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  4. page Genomics and Phylogeny (deleted) edited
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